Multivitamins…Do I need them?

If you get at least 5 servings of vegetables per day, and eat a wide variety of non-processed foods, then maybe you don’t need one.*

  • Only 6% of individuals achieve the recommended target for vegetables; and only 8% achieve their recommended target for fruit in an average day (this target was 3 fruit and 2 vegetable serving per day, which is still very low)*
  • The average American eats more processed vegetables than fresh.*

Here are a few benefits of some of the key vitamins and minerals in a good multivitamin*

  • Folic acid (Vitamin B9) has been found to decrease the incidence (occurrence) of neural tube defects (spina bifida), breast cancer, and colon cancer.
  • Folate (Vitamin B9), Vitamin B12, and Vitamin B6, help to break down Homocysteine.  High levels of homocysteine are associated with stroke, osteoporosis, blood vessel disease, cervical cancer and even macular degeneration.  They also help maintain nerve function and support the adrenal gland.
  • Many B vitamins are needed co-factors in enzyme reactions in the cell.  They are an important component in giving the cell the energy it needs.
  • Vitamin B6 can decrease PMS symptoms and depression.
  • Vitamin C, E, Beta Carotene and Zinc have been shown to slow the progression of macular degeneration, a significant source of blindness in the U.S.
  • Minerals which are chelated (bound to a protein or sugar) are better absorbed.   For instance, 17% of inorganic calcium is absorbed compared with 44% of chelated calcium.   Magnesium chelate is absorbed 5 times better than its inorganic form

My requirements for a “good” multivitamin:Requirements for a good multivitamin

If you would like to order a good quality multivitamin, click here or contact me.*

*disclaimer: RESULTS MAY VARY DEPENDING UPON STARTING POINT, GOALS, AND EFFORT.
THE STATEMENTS ON THIS SITE HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA.
THE INFORMATION ON THIS WEBSITE ARE NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

Provided by:  TetonSage 1066 N Yellowstone Highway, Rexburg, ID 83440

 

 

 

 

(1. NFVA National action Plan 2010 report Card  2.Giovannucci E, et al.  Alcohol, low-methionine-low-folate diets, and risk of colon cancer in men.  J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995; 87:265-273 3.Su LJ, Arab L.  Ann Epidemiol 2001 Jan;11(1):65-72     4. Zhang S, Hunter DH, Hankinson SE, et al.  A prospective study of folate intake and risk of breast cancer. JAMA 1999;281: 1632-1637  5.Shaw GM, et al.  Periconceptional vitamin use, dietary folate and the occurrence of neural tube defects.  Epidemiology.   1995;6:219-226.  6. Schadri S, Berser A, Schub J. et al: N Eng J M.  2002;346:476-483.   7. Age Related Eye Disease Study Arch Opthalmology, Oct. 2001; 119:1417-1436.    8. CHAOS Study. The Lancet, 1996; 347: 781-786.   9. Helzlsouer KJ, et al.  Association between alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, selenium, and subsequent prostate cancer.  J Natl Cancer Inst.  200; 92:2018-2023.  10. The effect of Vitamin E and beta carotene on the incidence of lung cancer and other cancers in male smokers.  N Engl J Med.  1994; 330:1029-1035.  11.  JACN, 1996;15:154-158.  12. Circulation, 1996;93:1107-1113.  13.  Heaney, RP MD Creighton University, Calcified Tissue International, 1990.  14. Graff, D, Research on Mineral Absorption, WeberStateUniversity, International Conference on Human Nutrition, 1995.)

 

 

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